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pekerotool 100x130 . By Peker O’ Tool ©

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Nowadays, while browsing a glamour magazine, the computer or mobile phone one expects to see nude images of women.

Jean Harlow

Jean Harlow

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe

Jayne Mansfield

Jayne Mansfield

During the mid 20th century, men drooled over Jean Harlow, Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, , Bettie Page, Elizabeth Taylor, etc.

Janet Jackson

Janet Jackson

Penelope Cruz

Penelope Cruz

Salma Hayek

Salma Hayek

Now they crave after the voluptuous bodies of Janet Jackson, Penelope Cruz, Salma Hayek, Halle Berry, Aishwarya Rai, and so on.

Whatever the wishful dreams are, ultimately, one has to wake up to reality.

Do you think all the pretty and pleasant faced women you come across, face-to-face daily, have symmetrical appendages? Are all women 8-Figured, like the women one sees in the media?

The answer is an emphatic “No”.

Almost all women are taught that their bodies hold all their inherent values. But, many women feel embarrassed when they see their own reflection in the mirrors. They see an uneven pair of breasts, asymmetrical nipples surrounded by small to wide areola. They see their pot bellies, stretch marks, body hair, scarred legs, etc. Then, they feel dejected for not looking even an iota like the women they see in films, televisions, and magazines. They then detest their own nude bodies. They keep their bodies hidden by clothing them. These women are not alone.

Jes Baker from Tucson, Arizona, describes herself as a mental health professional, pastry chef, ex-art major, crazy cat lady, fat model, fiery advocate, and total pain in the ass.

Liora K., is an Arizona photographer. She uses nudity in her artwork. Liora says that she would, and do, use nudity in her artwork: “It’s not accidental. I love photographing bodies. I find them all beautiful, and I find that nude bodies evoke a sense of connection among humans in a way that clothed bodies don’t.”

Jes Baker and Liora decided “that it was time to see more diversity represented in the media … But not just diversity. Diversity framed beautifully.”

In 2013, they hosted the largest photo shoot they had ever done. All kinds of women, 68 in all, were photographed and shown nude online. They proved that the unphotoshopped images of the women’s bodies did not need changing or shifting, and they were enough.

Recently, Jes Baker and Liora K., joined hands in another project along with 96 other women. They undressed their glorious bodies in a beautiful room in Tucson, Arizona.

collage vertical cropped

Jes Baker said:

“Nearly all had something to personally gain from the experience; it was a test of self-trust. They bared all to defy a lifetime of being told that their bodies were less than camera ready. And defy they did. Every time the shutter clicked, triumph was theirs. God, it was moving.

But they also bared all for you. They undressed because they wanted to share their curves and angles, smiles and frowns, firmness and softness, strength and fear… with you. With the world. With everyone who wonders if they are alone in their physical form.

We all know that what we see in the media isn’t the whole story. It’s not representative of all of us. And because of what we see (or rather DON’T see) we start to believe that we are the only one with our particular stretch marks. Our uneven boobs. Our scarred legs. Our asymmetrical nipples. Our belly shape. Our body hair. Our what-ever-it-is-that-you-don’t-see-on-display-any-where-else… Rarely do we see our beautiful and complex combination of body parts that makes us magnificent.

And when we feel alone in our body, we feel as though we are not enough. When the truth is: we are MORE than enough. And we are not alone.”

Click on this link to view the whole series at The Expose Project’s website  –> “EXPOSE: SHEDDING LIGHT ON COLLECTIVE BEAUTY” 

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